The Easiest Social Media Setup For Your Program!

I had an awesome time at TMEA this past weekend!  I am honored to teach in the best state for music education in the country, and to have an awesome professional association/convention such as TMEA.  If you teach in Texas and didn’t attend, you are missing out on an excellent opportunity to recharge your batteries and grow as an educator.  If you live out of state, come join us! I’ve been to a couple of conventions in other states and they are miniscule compared to TMEA. YOU NEED TO GO NEXT YEAR!!!!

Ok, back to business.  There is one question I answered more than any other at TMEA this year. “How should I set up/manage social media for my program?” Great question! And one that can be answered easily.Social-media-for-public-relations1

There are tons of free, easy to use, and integratable platforms out there that make having a professional social media presence easy! Here’s how I manage my groups all from my cell phone!

  1. Social Media – The followers of your program (parents/students/community members) are everywhere. EVERYWHERE! Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google +. Create an account for each site for your program. IN a minute I’ll show you how to post to them all with ease!
  2. Google Calendar – This is an essential part of my day!  I have different calendars set up for each of my ensembles/classes, and can view any or all of these events on one screen.  I can share events with my coworkers, allow them to view my calendar so they can make scheduling decisions without me having to be present, I can set reminders to alert me of upcoming events, and I can embed any of these calendars (like my band calendar) into a website.  I can now update my public band calendar that’s visible to parents on our website from my smartphone by just opening my calendar app.
  3. Remind – Want a safe way to send messages to your student group and parents? Remind (formerly Remind 101) is a one-way text messaging system that students and parents can subscribe to.  You can send them SMS messages from any internet connected device (including your desktop computer), but they can’t text back.  I use this every Friday night to notify parents when we leave football games and when we’ll return.  You can also schedule reminder text messages so kids don’t forget to bring important items, or use it as a reminder for scheduled rehearsals.
  4. HootSuite – Now that you have created all those accounts mentioned above, manage them all from one easy to use service. Great functionality to post simultaneously to all your social media outlets, or to simply read all your feeds in one place. Best of all, there’s an app for that! I can post pictures of a concert or contest to all the social media outlets, and my website from my cell phone! Yes my website. That’s because I use…
  5. WordPress Blog For A Website  – It’s very fast and easy to create a basic website using WordPress for your school groups.  You can embed your Google Calendar, post to it via HootSuite, embed a Remind widget to post those text messages to your website, and basically give everyone a home base to get all the information they need for your groups.  Create multiple pages, or multiple blogs for each of your groups. It’s all free!

The entire process of setting all of this up and making it functional should take under an hour! Best of all, it’s easy to keep everyone up to date and keep the lines of communication open, freeing up time in the process.

What sort of tech/education questions do you have?  Leave a comment below and I’ll answer those questions in an upcoming post.

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Creating An Easy Transition

You may have noticed a silence on my blog recently. This has been due to a number of things, but mostly due to the craziness of finishing a school year. I just checked my calendar for the rest of the school year and realized that we have 20 days of school left. Of those 20 days of school, I will be traveling on school related business 9 of those days! It’s definitely a crazy time of year.

The other thing that has been occupying my time lately is a new job! I will be teaching at a new school next year in the DFW area (I’m not saying which one in order to give the current teacher time to make the announcement to their students.) The new position will allow me to teach courses that I absolutely love and will allow me to spend much more time at home with my wife and 17 month-old daughter. While I’ll miss my current coworkers, students, and administrators, I am definitely looking forward to a new school, new challenges, new people, and new opportunities with my family.

Being neck deep in a transitioning job has made me largely aware of the types of things that I can do to help whoever follows me in my current position. Here are some ideas I’ve come up with that you can use to ease the transition when you move on to your next job!

  • Leave a detailed calendar of your previous school year – I remember the first year at my current school felt like a game of Let’s Make A Deal where we were always wondering what was behind the next door. Never knowing what was expected of the band, or what unknown event was coming up next was a nightmare. This little move should help a new director plan out the year with pretty good accuracy.
  • Create an “important contacts” list – Names, phone numbers, emails, and a short job description of important people in the district, and those that service the district such as road reps and vendors, will aide the new director
  • Leave a list of those “expected” responsibilities – We all know that we often get saddled with duties that are not described in our interview or official job description. Giving the new teacher a heads up on what was expected but not detailed might save them a lot of hassle.
  • Prepare your students – Leaving without preparing your students will do nothing but poison their relationship with a new director. I had a negative experience with this once, and the way the director left their school totally devastated the program. The program has been a revolving door ever since. Be honest with your students, give them and yourself opportunity to say goodbye, and encourage them to give the incoming teacher a chance.
  • Take a thorough inventory – My wife and I worked until 3:00am trying to do an inventory because the school didn’t have any idea what it owned. We were getting ready to start summer band and had no idea if anything worked, or if there were instruments to issue to students. Nobody knew anything. Please don’t let this happen by providing a recent inventory for the new director.

Bottom line: Go above and beyond to make the experience of a new teacher following you as easy and enjoyable as possible. It’s common courtesy to be professional, but going a little beyond that will allow you to leave your program in the best situation possible.

Question: What else can be done to ease a transition?